Skip navigation.

Login | Register | Help | Contact Us | FAQ | Site Map

Regional Traffic Operations Center

The Regional Traffic Operations Center (RTOC) is a joint venture of the Monroe County Department of Transportation, Monroe County Airport Authority, New York State Department of Transportation and the New York State Police. The facility is located at 1155 Scottsville Road has been in operation since 2002.

Picture of County Executive Maggie Brooks and other officials at the RTOC Ribbon Cutting Ceremony, May 13, 2002.

County Executive Maggie Brooks and other officials at the RTOC Ribbon Cutting Ceremony, May 13, 2002.

Picture of the RTOC Building.

The facility brings together under one roof a wide variety of traffic and emergency responders. These agencies each contribute a different viewpoint of traffic which, when put together, form complete detection and response capabilities for both the daily routine of traffic as well as traffic incident management.

Picture of the Traffic Control Center at the Regional Traffic Operations Center.

The Traffic Control Center at the Regional Traffic Operations Center.

Picture of the NYSDOT Garage at RTOC.

The NYSDOT Garage at RTOC.

The Monroe County Department of Transportation, which oversees the City of Rochester and Monroe County arterial street network, houses their Traffic Control Center at RTOC. From here, a majority of the County's 629 traffic signals can be monitored and controlled remotely. Dispatch facilities for signals & highways maintenance crews are also based at RTOC.

To report traffic signal malfunctions, downed or missing traffic signs (including street name signs), or highway maintenance issues, please call the Traffic Control Center at (585) 753-7700. This number can be called anytime, day or night. It will help crews respond better if you can provide details about the location such as the side of road or direction of travel affected, and about the situation such as type of sign or condition observed.

Remember: NYSDMV Law requires that you treat a dark traffic signal as a four-way stop.

Visit the New York State Department of Transportation website.

Visit the New York State Police website.

Traffic Control Center at RTOC

Managing Traffic Flow in Rochester

The Monroe County Department of Transportation Traffic Control System keeps traffic in Monroe County and the Greater Rochester area flowing smoothly and efficiently on a daily basis.

Picture of traffic signal cabinets awaiting installation.

Traffic signal cabinets awaiting installation.

Picture of traffic signals truck in RTOC garage.

Traffic signals truck in RTOC garage.

To help accomplish this mission, the department monitors current traffic flow and develops plans to move traffic through a series of traffic signals with a minimum of stops.

The Computerized Traffic Control System allows Monroe County to handle the challenges presented by today’s urban transportation system.

Goals of the Traffic Control Center

  • Permit efficient use of existing roadways.
  • Improve travel times and reduce fuel consumption.
  • Improve the environment by reducing the emission of pollutants.
  • Improve motorist and pedestrian safety.
  • Enable the county to keep pace with traffic needs and growth by providing information to develop traffic improvement plans.

The Computerized Traffic Control System is located in the Traffic Control Center at the Regional Traffic Operations Center (RTOC) at 1155 Scottsville Road.

The system measures and analyzes traffic conditions, and automatically controls the timing of the traffic signals. It displays traffic information and conditions on the display wall map as well as on data terminals. This information enables the traffic engineers and operators to continuously monitor the traffic system. If necessary, they can override the computer system to take immediate corrective action for any abnormal traffic condition encountered.

How It Operates

The Computerized Traffic Control System utilizes vehicle sensors located in the pavement to measure traffic volumes, speeds, and how long the sensors are occupied.

This information is transmitted to the central computer via county-owned coaxial cable every one-half second. The computer analyzes the data and selects the timing pattern that can best serve the prevailing traffic flow.

The computer then sends commands to the local on-street controllers which implement the timing of the intersection signal lights. The local intersection status is continually monitored; if a failure is detected, it is immediately reported.

In the event of a computer failure, the traffic signals are automatically switched to a backup coordination system.