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Dinolfo Calls on President Trump to Sign Federal Opioid Legislation

Monroe County Executive Cheryl Dinolfo joined Senator Chuck Schumer and other statewide leaders in urging President Trump to sign the new federal INTERDICT Act. The bill would give U.S Customs and Border Protection (CBP) greater resources to combat and prevent fentanyl imports from countries such as China and Mexico.

“As I have since the beginning, I am proud to stand with Senator Schumer in support of this important solution to help stem the tide of the national heroin and opioid crisis,” said Dinolfo. “Every day, lethal doses of fentanyl and other illicit substances pour into the United States across our borders, fanning the flames of this massive epidemic. It is vital that Border Agents have every possible tool at their disposal to detect these substances before they hit our streets, further damage our communities, and take more lives.”

Because of its extreme potency, fentanyl typically comes in small amounts, making it difficult for authorities to detect. The bill would increase the number of chemical screening devices available to the U.S Customs and Border Protection, equipping them with the highest quality resources and personnel to intercept fentanyl and other synthetic opioids. In total, the act would provide $15 million in added resources to combat the epidemic.

“The victims of this crisis are not just statistics on a page. These are our sons and daughters, sisters and brothers, parents, neighbors, and friends,” said Dinolfo. “For the sake of our families and our future, I urge the President to sign this legislation as soon as possible to give our federal agents the tools they need to stop the epidemic at its source.”

Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid that is 50 to 100 times stronger than heroin. The majority of fentanyl being sold on the street is illegally manufactured, most commonly in China. The illicit substances are then often smuggled into the U.S., often over the Mexican border.

Heroin and opioid overdoses have risen steadily in the United States over the last decade.